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As we live longer, there is a greater likelihood of disability and the need for long-term care. However, most Americans have inadequate resources or income for such care and also lack long-term care insurance or similar insurance products. As a result, some elderly and disabled...

Long-term care Medicaid helps pay for long-term care costs if certain eligibility requirements such as medical necessity, Medicaid bed availability, “countable” resources being below a $2,000 limit, restrictions on most uncompensated transfers if made within five years of application, etc., are met. In this case the...

Parents own homestead as their major asset. Their health is beginning to decline, and neither of them have long-term care insurance or enough income or assets to pay for long-term care. As a result, if either of them needs long-term care, Medicaid is likely to...

Under federal long-term care Medicaid laws, there is a presumption of “guilt” if there is an uncompensated transfer within five (5) years of an application for long-term Medicaid (which helps pay for institutional care, drugs, etc.) since long-term care is “means-tested” In other words, the...

The federal law called the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act gives some people with disabilities or their families to establish a tax-free savings account that will not count as a resource for Medicaid eligibility (which is “means-tested”). For an adult disabled person who...